Facebook content marketing program – Content24

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Welcome to Content24. Why is it different? Because it’s a digest of the stories that have made an impact over the past 24 hours, and not just a platform for recycled content marketing. Today we’re looking at the New York Times, Facebook and a response to yesterday’s view on what content actually is

Facebook brings in agency for content marketing role

Facebook has added Tongal, an agency specialising in the production of video content marketing for brands, to the Facebook Marketing Partner Program.

The scheme, which launched earlier this year, is a Facebook-recommended list of suppliers of marketing services who want to produce content on the platform.

Required skills for inclusion on the list, in addition to content marketing, are ad technology, media buying, FBX, small business solutions, community management, audience onboarding, measurement and audience data provision.

To be a content marketing partner you can deliver content or technology.

However, the five requirements to join are fairly non-specific. For example, one is to “provide insights with metrics allowing marketers to understand the performance of content with relation to business objectives”. Another is “Show consistent track record of client success”.

So, not too hard to achieve then. The real question is, does it pay to do so?

For more on the scheme go here.

New York Times’ shift to mobile

Digiday has written up a piece looking at the New York Times and its focus on mobile. It examines the seven-strong team responsible for push notifications and messaging. For some this number of people might seem like over-resourcing. Yet when you consider the shift towards viewing news via apps, it looks like a sensible move.

An answer to yesterday’s view that content is less than the vehicle

Yesterday’s Campaign published a post by ad man Dave Trott. In it he said that content was less important than the method of delivery. To illustrate this he used the analogy of a lorry that can deliver a variety of items. His point was that it’s the method that matters, not what the lorry carries.

Obviously, we disagreed. So did someone from another advertising agency, except this one works in content marketing. His name is Richard Cable and he’s from Bartle Bogle Hegarty.

This post may as well end with his comment.

He said: “Where advertising is a marketing communication that interrupts what you are doing (whether you like it or not), content is a marketing communication that you choose to spend time with. It’s not about being the thing people block, skip or ignore, but the thing they appreciate, seek out and share.”

 

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